Jamie Dee Frontiero - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage



Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 3/31/2019

Many of us will move home several times throughout our lives. Whether itís relocating for work, needing a bigger house for children, or a quiet place to retire to, itís likely that the home you live in now wonít be yours forever.

 As a result, many homeowners wonder what they can do to ensure their home will have a high resale value when the time comes to move on.

 The good news is that there are a lot of things you can do now that will give you a good return on investment when it comes to selling your home later. However, there are a few factors that affect a homeís valuation that are out of your control. Weíll talk about all of those factors below. So, read on for a list of the factors that affect your homeís resale value.

 The age of your home

Your house may not complain about it, but it isnít getting any younger. Homes tend to slowly decrease in value over time. A home built in the late 1970s, even if itís well taken care of, most likely wonít sell for the same price as a 15-year-old home.

There is one exception to the rule, however, and that is historical houses. Homes that are a century old can sell for top dollar because of the craftsmanship and history that the house contains.

Admittedly, this is a niche market, as many people just want a safe and efficient home to live in. However, there are some homebuyers who will put in a bit of extra work around the house for the chance to live inside of a piece of history.

Smart renovations

When youíre upgrading your house itís important to remember how that upgrade will pay off years down the road. Some renovations will almost always give a good return on investment such as a finished basement or attic and improving efficiency via added insulation or replacing windows.

Renovations that match a very specific decorative taste or style could come back to haunt you. This includes bathroom sinks, kitchen cabinets, countertops, and other expensive projects that are subject to the next ownerís taste. While these upgrades can give a good return on your investment, theyíre more likely to be successful if they fit the current trends of style and craftsmanship.

Neighborhood and town

One of the factors of home valuation that you have little control over is the town and neighborhood the house is located in. If there are closed down businesses, foreclosed and deteriorating homes then potential buyers might be turned off to the neighborhood.

Similarly, the town you live in has a lot to do with how much people are willing to spend. If you have easy access to interstate highways and large cities, highly rated schools, and good local infrastructure, then buyers are likely to take these into consideration when making an offer, as the average cost of a home in your town is likely higher than some surrounding towns.




Tags: home   resale value   valuation  
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Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 8/26/2018

 

If youíve paid any attention to home and living catalogues over the years youíve probably noticed how quickly home decor trends come and go. Just like in the world of fashion, the people who manufacture homegoods do it with one idea in mind: to keep you coming back for more.


Thereís an important distinction to be made between a trend and a style. Youíve probably seen several homes that adhere to the styles of farmhouse, mid-century modern, industrial, and so on. However, within these styles there are several trends that flood magazines and houses each year. While everyone wants to keep their home up to date, itís important to keep a watchful eye out for homegoods that are just capitalizing on the latest trends.


In this article, weíll break down some home decor tips that will help you pick the homegoods that will look great year after year while also serving a useful function in your house. And, weíll help you avoid the trends that put a strain on your wallet each year.

Keep the big picture in mind


When browsing through the latest Crate & Barrel catalog, itís tempting to order items based on liking the way they look in the picture. However, itís important to remember how it would look in your own home. This is true for many items around the home, like houseplants. If you have a farmhouse-style home, decorating it with cacti or zen gardens might appear out of place and thus will be short-lived decorations.


Aside from the inside of your home, itís important to keep in mind the architectural style of your house. It would seem strange, for example, to enter a brownstone building in Brooklyn to find it filled with country style decorations. That isnít to say you need to always adhere exclusively to the architectural style of the building (some juxtapositions work well together and are a fun way to give your home some originality).

Good design sticks around


Appearance isnít everything. When it comes to things like furniture, appliances, and kitchenware youíll find that usefulness and ease of access is a key feature. Before buying one of these items, think about whether it serves a purpose, and if it serves that purpose better than your current item. Read reviews or ask friends and family about these items before purchasing them.

Stick to the classics


One of the latest trends to hit coffee shops around the country is the tall metal stool. Sometimes they have a backrest, sometimes they donít. They can be painted a neutral color or left metallic and unfinished.


While these stools may fit neatly into the modern, industrial look, they might not fit your particular needs. In some instances, itís better to stick to the tried-and-true furniture items for your home. If youíre placing the stools somewhere that people are going to sit often and for long periods of time, youíll want them to be comfortable. Donít sacrifice comfort in your own home just because something looks good.




Tags: home   interior design   Decor   house   homegoods   design  
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Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 1/28/2018

Many new homeowners see getting a dog as a rite of passage to homeownership. Oftentimes, theyíre moving from apartment buildings that didnít allow dogs or parents who didnít want pets and having their own home finally seems like their chance at having a dog. However, itís important to take into consideration several factors before buying or adopting a dog.

In this article, weíll talk about what it means to be both a dog owner and a homeowner, and discuss how to tell if buying a dog is a good move for you in your new home.

Time management

It has been said that having a dog is like having a two-year-old child who stays that difficult age for ten years. Depending on the dogís breed, temperament, and trainability, thereís a chance you could be in for a handful of a dog.

The first factor in deciding whether or not to get a dog in your new home is to determine if you have the time to take care of it. If you work long hours or have to travel for work, these are obvious signals that you might not have time to spend with a pet who needs care and attention.

However, you should also consider whether you have an extra hour each morning and evening to feed and play with your dog who will need exercise to stay healthy. Youíll also need to set aside time each week for things like training, socializing, bathing, trimming their nails, and so on.

All of these commitments add up, so itís important to consider how much time you have before going down to the shelter to or kennel to pick up a new dog.

Dogs are expensive

Most people who donít own a dog do not realize how expensive they are. Food is just the tip of the iceberg, and if youíre planning on getting a large dog, food can cost you well over $100 each month. On top of food, youíll need to be prepared to spend up to $200 for each visit to the vet and for necessary medications for things like heartworm, fleas, and ticks.

Dog training is also highly recommended to ensure that you and your dog both have a better understanding of whatís expected of one another. Training will help with things like obedience, but also will improve your dogís behavior by giving them a job to focus their energy on (rather than on tearing up your furniture).

Dogs need space

It may seem like you have all the space in the world in your new home, especially if you moved from a small apartment. However, many dog breeds require room to run freely. If you want to get a sporting dog, youíll either need to take them somewhere they can run each day, or have a yard large enough for them to run in.

If you choose the latter, youíll need to make sure your dog is safe from traffic if you live on a busy street. That could mean spending hundreds of dollars to erect a fence.

Ultimately, having a dog can be a highly rewarding experience for you and your pet. But now that you know some of the fine print to dog ownership, youíll be able to make a more informed decision on whether or not getting a dog is right for you.




Tags: home   dogs   dog  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 7/24/2016

If you're anything like me, your household pet is like a member of the family. Most of us have a soft spot for our pets. When they're hurt we feel their pain. When they're sick we get worried sick about what might be wrong. A difficult part of owning a pet is that since we can't verbally communicate (aside from some commands and accolades) we aren't able to always read how they're feeling. Fortunately, much work has been done when it comes to understanding the nonverbal languages that our animal companions speak. Reading body language and understand your dog's bark and cat's meow can help you be a better pet owner and a better companion to your dog or cat. In this article, we'll let you in on some little known facts about what the body language of your pet means.

Do you speak dog?

Our canine companions tend to let us know how they're feeling. When they're scared they lower their tail and cower. When they're happy they attach us while licks. However, there are many misconceptions about the body language of dogs. Here are some important ones every dog owner should know:
  • Yawning.†As humans, we yawn when we're tired. Dogs also share this trait. But if you own one you've probably noticed them yawning much more frequently than we do. This is because they also yawn when they're unsure of a situation, if they're around someone new, and if they're trying to diffuse tension.
  • Whale eye.†This is phenomenon occurs when your dog tilts her head and stares out of the corner of her eye, exposing the whites of her eyes. This can be mistaken for a "cute puppy" look, but it normally means they are afraid.
  • Face-licking.†As humans we tend to see face-licking as a sign of affection. In dogs, however, it is more likely a friendly sign of appeasement. It is usually seen in puppies and if it carries on into adulthood it can be problematic if your dog frequently licks other dogs' faces who might not appreciate the gesture.
  • Tail position.†Horizontal can mean the dog is alert. Facing upwards can mean dominance and aggression. Tail down can mean the dog isn't feeling well or is sad. Tail tucked can mean fear and aggression.

What's your cat thinking?

Cats tend to be a bit more subtle in their communication than dogs (with the exception of when they're hungry and meowing incessantly). However, if you pay attention you can still get a glimpse into how your cat is feeling. There are three main indicators you should notice when trying to read your cat: the tail, eyes, and ears.
  • Tail.†A cat's tail will tell you a lot about their mood. A tail standing up and wagging means a cat is happy. However, a straight up, rigid tail can mean a cat who is aggressive. Similarly, a cat who is thumping their tail or waiving it with force can also be trying to show dominance and aggression.
  • Eyes.†Cat's eyes are very intense and expressive. Dilated†pupils and a focused look can mean the cat is surprised or scared, but can also mean it is hunting something. Relaxed pupils, blinking eyes, or closed eyes, however all mean that the cat feels comfortable and not threatened.
  • Ears.†Ears pointing up are somewhat ambiguous; it can mean playfulness or attentiveness. Ears pointing back, however, are a sign of fear and aggression.




Tags: pets   home   dogs   cats   animals   dog   pet   cat  
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