Jamie Dee Frontiero - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage



Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 2/24/2019

For many homeowners, your most significant financial asset is the home in which you live. Most assume, like previous generations, that their home will play a large part in their retirement plan. What part? That depends. You could sell your home, move into something smaller and use the excess to fund your retirement plans. If your home is paid off, you might plan to live in it until you die. Even if you don't have a plan, everyone has told you that buying a home is a great investment, so it should work out. Right? Not every home is the best bet for your retirement plans. Read to find out how your property stacks up.

Asset or Liability?

Most people think of their home as an asset. It certainly can be, but if youíre planning on selling it to fund your retirement, keep in mind youíll need somewhere else to live. If you have a free option, like staying with your kids, thatís great! 100% asset. If youíre going to re-invest a portion of it into a new smaller home, then its maybe 50% asset and 50% liability. That number varies depending on just how much you plan to spend, and realistically how much the market will bear. 

Equity vs. Home Value

Contrary to popular belief, your investment equity isnít always the same as the home value. If you share ownership with the bank, your actual investment is the home's current market value less what you owe your lender. With the additional fees and taxes, your take away could be substantially less than you thought. This can hurt you when the market no longer supports your previous home value. If your mortgage is higher than you can sell for, you'll end up just losing money.

Reverse Mortgage

Reverse mortgages often are advertised as a way to stay in your house and still have an income during your retirement years. However, much of the time you don't actually receive the entire equity of your home. Lastly, since you're essentially selling your home to your lender, you're giving up ownership of your home. That means your estate and heirs will either have to pay off the mortgage or give up the house. It's always wise to make sure your children or heirs understand that your home is no longer part of their inheritance. 

Location

If this is your forever home, location is the prime feature to consider. This is a double-edged sword though. Leave it too late, and you wonít be able to pay off the property in time for retirement, buy it too early, and your needs could change. The younger generations are prime for moving to new cities and even states, so even if they live nearby now, that could quickly change. You should consider how your body will react to severe or inclement weather (and your ability to handle the maintenance) as you get older. You could end up needing to make a last minute sale. If you can afford an investment property, an alternative is to get a vacation home in the area you want to retire. That way, you can sell your current home for the income and move into your paid-off vacation property in your retirement location. 

Ask your Realtor about the right homes for both your needs right now and those in the future.





Posted by Jamie Dee Frontiero on 11/11/2018

Depending on how many years youíve been working, retirement can seem like itís too far in the future to worry about or too close to be able to effectively make any real change.

 However, retirement is about more than doing the math and investment planning. Retirement includes making several life decisions, and considering things you may not have thought of before.

 In this article, weíre going to talk about planning aspects of your retirement including your home and assets, your savings and investments, and setting and achieving goals for yourself.

Pay yourself first

If it feels like your paycheck is spent before you get a chance to set any aside each week, youíre not alone. However, itís never too late to start setting aside money for retirement. The ďpay yourself firstĒ theory states that you should set aside a certain amount for bills, savings, and retirement plans before you spend a dime of your paycheck each week.

The easiest way to achieve this is to take advantage of an employer-based contribution matching program such as a 401K. However, if you are self-employed you can still open up an individual retirement account (IRA) or a Solo 401K. With an IRA, you determine where you want to invest your money, and can choose safer or riskier investments based on your own preferences.

Draw up your plan, literally

Thereís no better way to start planning than to actually sit down with a notebook or your computer and start figuring out what you want to save and how you want to achieve those savings.

Youíll want to determine how much money you can accrue in your savings account, estimate the price of your assets and properties, and look at the projected return on investment for any IRAs or 401Ks you have in place.

As you likely know, these numbers are all projections. Thereís no way to know for sure how much your home will be worth, or how well your investments will do by the time youíre ready to retire.

So, one of the most important aspects of making this checklist is to return to it yearly to determine if you should change your investments or alter your retirement goals.

Determine your lifestyle needs

Whether you have dreams of settling down in a quiet town for retirement, touring the country in an RV, or traveling the world, youíll need to find out how you can make it possible on your retirement plan.

You and your spouse will need to sit down and draw up a plan for your mutual retirement goals. Determine which expenses you can do away with in retirement so that you can fulfill other goals. Having these conversations now will help you more effectively plan for the future. And, remember that the time of your retirement is always closer than you think.  




Categories: Uncategorized